How Hybrid Teams Are Critical To Growth

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The following was originally posted on Forbes.com

By Greg Kihlström, CEO, CareerGig

The workforce is in a continual shift as markets change, companies grow and refocus, and external factors shape how, when and even where we work. Because of these considerations, and countless others, companies need to be agile in their approach to the composition of their workforce. Hybrid workforces build on this idea, by creating teams that are a mixture of full-time, long-term employees and short-term contract and freelance workers. 

As we’ll see below, this mixture of team members, as well as the different ways of thinking, problem-solving, and areas of focus they provide, will give companies the agile workforce they need. Let’s see why hybrid teams are critical to success for businesses today.

Hyper-specialization is not necessarily a constant need.

It can be challenging to staff a company properly, regardless of the size. With continually shifting needs, and increasing specialization in many domains, what is needed one month may not be needed the next. Full-time employees need to be kept utilized in order to provide maximum value, so roles with highly specialized and rarely used skill sets pose a unique challenge: Should you hire someone full-time that may not be fully utilized, or should you bring in a contractor for a shorter period of time?

For instance, when I ran a digital experience for a number of years, we often had projects that demanded a specific experience, or skill set for a short period of time. It would not have been wise for us to turn down a highly profitable project or scope of work, so we brought on a specialist for a short duration to augment our other capabilities. I’ve found that this is oftentimes the best-case scenario, one that allows you to preserve a highly-functioning team that can perform most tasks but supplement it with experts who can fill in gaps that rarely need to be filled, yet are highly valuable.

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